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Saba: The rare Caribbean island where beaches aren't the draw

 CNN Travel Saba should have an inferiority complex.

After all, this speck of a five-square-mile Caribbean island -- a special municipality of the Netherlands -- is left off many maps. Even for the savviest of travelers, it's often an off-the-radar destination with a name of uncertain pronunciation. (It's "say-bah.")

A scarcity of cruise ships and beaches -- short of a seasonal sandy strip that comes and goes with the tide at turbulent Wells Bay and a petite man-made curve of sand at Cove Bay -- may explain why Saba isn't a major tourist draw.

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