Skip to main content

Turks and Caicos Islands

MiamiHerald.com: "The Turks and Caicos also have some very high-end resorts. The kind where you might run into a star, someone like, oh, Conan O'Brien. I saw him hiding under a baseball cap pulled so low over his face that I might not have recognized him but for skin so white it was almost blue.
Tourists like O'Brien have helped make Turks and Caicos Islands, or TCI, a success story. Twenty years ago, these 40-some islands and cays had few paved roads or services. Now this British crown colony has one of the world's fastest-growing economies; its 33,000 residents share their islands with about 300,000 tourists annually. There are a dozen or so high-end resorts where overnight stays often top $1,000 a night and a booming real estate market that caters to multimillionaires."

Popular posts from this blog

Forbes   I recently spent a week in  Turks and Caicos , my first time out of the country since the pandemic hit. Like many Caribbean countries, Turks and Caicos rely  almost entirely on tourism  to power their economy, so they’re desperate for travelers to return. I’m happy to report that these beautiful beaches felt like an escape from the despair of this global pandemic, and here’s how they are keeping travelers safe.

Travel Tips when Cruising to Bermuda

Corsavoo.com : "Bermuda is British - judges wear powdered wigs, drivers are the left side of the road, and dress is fairly conservative (especially on the golf courses upholstery cleaning codes upscale restaurants). Of course, Bermuda shorts are seen everywhere - even on businessmen wearing jackets and ties! Bikinis are not permitted more than 25 feet from the ocean. Bermuda is British - judges wear powdered wigs, drivers are the left side of the road, and dress is fairly conservative (especially on the golf courses upholstery cleaning codes upscale restaurants). Of course, Bermuda shorts are seen everywhere - even on businessmen wearing jackets and ties! Bikinis are not permitted more than 25 feet from the ocean."

Advocate|Call for LIAT support

Advocate : "According to Gonsalves, the issue of the increased cost of air travel and the fashioning of a sound air transport policy, are matters on which the regions people expect satisfactory answers and effective resolution. It cannot be right nor reasonable to expect the tax payers of Antigua and Barbuda, Barbados and St. Vincent and the Grenadines, to continue to subsidise the regional air travel of other member states, he stated. It is in my view an act of irresponsibility, for any government to stand askance from regional solutions to the practical issues of intra-regional air travel. More over, it is entirely contrary to the letter and spirit of the regional integration movement, for some governments to act subversively of the enterprise known as LIAT. "